Activities & Resources

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Peter. © Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Peter. © Ezra Jack Keats Foundation

Jewish Contributions to American Illustration

Learn more about the American Jews who have helped create the nation’s beloved children’s books, iconic graphic novels and their superheroes, and syndicated comics and illustrations. Through the prism of their Jewish identity, and often by approaching their work through the lens of social justice, these keen and witty social observers reflect us and our world in lasting ways.  


John Foster Carr's "Guide to the United States for Jewish Immigrants" Yiddish and English map, 1913. National Museum of American Jewish History.Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Forer, in honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. Morris L. and Judge Lois G. Forer.

John Foster Carr's "Guide to the United States for Jewish Immigrants" Yiddish and English map, 1913. National Museum of American Jewish History.Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Forer, in honor of the 50th wedding anniversary of Mr. Morris L. and Judge Lois G. Forer.

50 States, 50 Stories

Every state in the U.S. has been impacted by the accomplishments and contributions of American Jewish men and women. Click through an interactive map to learn about the Jewish history behind each state.


Lesson Plans & Reading Lists

Whether you're a student, teacher, or lifelong learner, these expertly-designed lesson plans and reading lists will help you celebrate JAHM in a classroom or at home.


Historical Timeline

Take a journey through more than 360 years of Jewish life in America with this overview timeline.


Related Websites

Surf the web for additional educational resources, including the websites of the JAHM Advisory Committee member organizations.


Speaking of American Jewish Heritage...

Looking for a dynamic speaker for a JAHM event? Peruse our list of scholars, musicians, artists, and authors whose area of expertise is American Jewish heritage and history.


Top Banner Image: Photograph, "Children Observe Passover Seder," Philadelphia, April 2, 1942. Collection of the National Museum of American Jewish History. 1991.17.14.